need in 30 minutes multiple choice same passage – AP English Lang

9.

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.

This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.

(1) Chancellor Kohl, Governing Mayor Diepgen, ladies and gentlemen: Twenty-four years ago, President John F. Kennedy visited Berlin, speaking to the people of this city and the world at the City Hall. Well, since then two other presidents have come, each in his turn, to Berlin. And today I, myself, make my second visit to your city.

(2) We come to Berlin, we American presidents, because it’s our duty to speak, in this place, of freedom. But I must confess, we’re drawn here by other things as well: by the feeling of history in this city, more than 500 years older than our own nation; by the beauty of the Grunewald and the Tiergarten; most of all, by your courage and determination. Perhaps the composer Paul Lincke understood something about American presidents. You see, like so many presidents before me, I come here today because wherever I go, whatever I do: Ich hab noch einen Koffer in Berlin. [I still have a suitcase in Berlin.]

(3) Our gathering today is being broadcast throughout Western Europe and North America. I understand that it is being seen and heard as well in the East. To those listening throughout Eastern Europe, a special word: Although I cannot be with you, I address my remarks to you just as surely as to those standing here before me. For I join you, as I join your fellow countrymen in the West, in this firm, this unalterable belief: Es gibt nur ein Berlin. [There is only one Berlin.]

(4)Behind me stands a wall that encircles the free sectors of this city, part of a vast system of barriers that divides the entire continent of Europe. From the Baltic, south, those barriers cut across Germany in a gash of barbed wire, concrete, dog runs, and guard towers. Farther south, there may be no visible, no obvious wall. But there remain armed guards and checkpoints all the same—still a restriction on the right to travel, still an instrument to impose upon ordinary men and women the will of a totalitarian state. Yet it is here in Berlin where the wall emerges most clearly; here, cutting across your city, where the news photo and the television screen have imprinted this brutal division of a continent upon the mind of the world. Standing before the Brandenburg Gate, every man is a German, separated from his fellow men. Every man is a Berliner, forced to look upon a scar.

(5)President von Weizsacker has said, “The German question is open as long as the Brandenburg Gate is closed.” Today I say: As long as the gate is closed, as long as this scar of a wall is permitted to stand, it is not the German question alone that remains open, but the question of freedom for all mankind. Yet I do not come here to lament. For I find in Berlin a message of hope, even in the shadow of this wall, a message of triumph.

(6)In this season of spring in 1945, the people of Berlin emerged from their air-raid shelters to find devastation. Thousands of miles away, the people of the United States reached out to help. And in 1947 Secretary of State—as you’ve been told—George Marshall announced the creation of what would become known as the Marshall Plan. Speaking precisely 40 years ago this month, he said: “Our policy is directed not against any country or doctrine, but against hunger, poverty, desperation, and chaos.”

(7)In the Reichstag a few moments ago, I saw a display commemorating this 40th anniversary of the Marshall Plan. I was struck by the sign on a burnt-out, gutted structure that was being rebuilt. I understand that Berliners of my own generation can remember seeing signs like it dotted throughout the western sectors of the city. The sign read simply: “The Marshall Plan is helping here to strengthen the free world.” A strong, free world in the West, that dream became real. Japan rose from ruin to become an economic giant. Italy, France, Belgium—virtually every nation in Western Europe saw political and economic rebirth; the European Community was founded.

(8)In West Germany and here in Berlin, there took place an economic miracle, the Wirtschaftswunder. Adenauer, Erhard, Reuter, and other leaders understood the practical importance of liberty—that just as truth can flourish only when the journalist is given freedom of speech, so prosperity can come about only when the farmer and businessman enjoy economic freedom. The German leaders reduced tariffs, expanded free trade, lowered taxes. From 1950 to 1960 alone, the standard of living in West Germany and Berlin doubled.

The purpose of discussing the motives of American presidents in paragraph two is to (5 points)

cite facts and figures in order to establish proof of his motives
acknowledge the failures of the leaders who have visited in the past
establish his own sincerity by aligning himself with trusted leaders
illustrate the hopelessness of repeated presidential visits to the area
reveal the futility of future presidential visits and summits to Berlin

10.

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.

This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.

(4) Behind me stands a wall that encircles the free sectors of this city, part of a vast system of barriers that divides the entire continent of Europe. From the Baltic, south, those barriers cut across Germany in a gash of barbed wire, concrete, dog runs, and guard towers. Farther south, there may be no visible, no obvious wall. But there remain armed guards and checkpoints all the same—still a restriction on the right to travel, still an instrument to impose upon ordinary men and women the will of a totalitarian state. Yet it is here in Berlin where the wall emerges most clearly; here, cutting across your city, where the news photo and the television screen have imprinted this brutal division of a continent upon the mind of the world. Standing before the Brandenburg Gate, every man is a German, separated from his fellow men. Every man is a Berliner, forced to look upon a scar.

A modern writer wants to adapt the ideas from this part of the speech. He wants to add relevant support for the claim made in the fourth sentence (reproduced below) of the paragraph by including a quote from a reliable source.

But there remain armed guards and checkpoints all the same—still a restriction on the right to travel, still an instrument to impose upon ordinary men and women the will of a totalitarian state.

Each of the following sources could help to achieve this purpose EXCEPT (5 points)

a local newspaper article which interviews three families affected by the travel restrictions and highlights the negative impact on their daily lives
an excerpt from an article published in a peer-reviewed journal that analyzes how checkpoints and travel restrictions are enforced by various totalitarian states
a blog post on an international university’s website which features extensive student interviews about places they would like to travel
a governmental database that features facts and statistics regarding mental health, unemployment, and crime rates in countries where people are not free to travel
a white paper from an international human rights organization that shows decreasing quality of health among citizens prohibited from traveling across checkpoints

11.

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.

This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.

“President von Weizsacker has said, ‘The German question is open as long as the Brandenburg Gate is closed.’ Today I say: As long as the gate is closed, as long as this scar of a wall is permitted to stand, it is not the German question alone that remains open, but the question of freedom for all mankind. Yet I do not come here to lament. For I find in Berlin a message of hope, even in the shadow of this wall, a message of triumph.”

In this paragraph, the speaker uses all of the following EXCEPT (5 points)

metaphor
rhetorical question
juxtaposition
connotative language
allusion

12.

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.

This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.

(4)Behind me stands a wall that encircles the free sectors of this city, part of a vast system of barriers that divides the entire continent of Europe. From the Baltic, south, those barriers cut across Germany in a gash of barbed wire, concrete, dog runs, and guard towers. Farther south, there may be no visible, no obvious wall. But there remain armed guards and checkpoints all the same—still a restriction on the right to travel, still an instrument to impose upon ordinary men and women the will of a totalitarian state. Yet it is here in Berlin where the wall emerges most clearly; here, cutting across your city, where the news photo and the television screen have imprinted this brutal division of a continent upon the mind of the world. Standing before the Brandenburg Gate, every man is a German, separated from his fellow men. Every man is a Berliner, forced to look upon a scar.

(5)President von Weizsacker has said, “The German question is open as long as the Brandenburg Gate is closed.” Today I say: As long as the gate is closed, as long as this scar of a wall is permitted to stand, it is not the German question alone that remains open, but the question of freedom for all mankind. Yet I do not come here to lament. For I find in Berlin a message of hope, even in the shadow of this wall, a message of triumph.

The tone of paragraph five can best be described as (5 points)

apathetic
cautionary
agitated
somber
optimistic

13.

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.

This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.

(1) Chancellor Kohl, Governing Mayor Diepgen, ladies and gentlemen: Twenty-four years ago, President John F. Kennedy visited Berlin, speaking to the people of this city and the world at the City Hall. (2) Well, since then two other presidents have come, each in his turn, to Berlin. (3) And today I, myself, make my second visit to your city.

(4) We come to Berlin, we American presidents, because it’s our duty to speak, in this place, of freedom. (5) But I must confess, we’re drawn here by other things as well: by the feeling of history in this city, more than 500 years older than our own nation; by the beauty of the Grunewald and the Tiergarten; most of all, by your courage and determination. (6) Perhaps the composer Paul Lincke understood something about American presidents. (7) You see, like so many presidents before me, I come here today because wherever I go, whatever I do: Ich hab noch einen Koffer in Berlin. [I still have a suitcase in Berlin.]

(8) Our gathering today is being broadcast throughout Western Europe and North America. (9) I understand that it is being seen and heard as well in the East. (10) To those listening throughout Eastern Europe, a special word: Although I cannot be with you, I address my remarks to you just as surely as to those standing here before me. (11) For I join you, as I join your fellow countrymen in the West, in this firm, this unalterable belief: Es gibt nur ein Berlin. [There is only one Berlin.]

(12) Behind me stands a wall that encircles the free sectors of this city, part of a vast system of barriers that divides the entire continent of Europe. (13) From the Baltic, south, those barriers cut across Germany in a gash of barbed wire, concrete, dog runs, and guard towers. Farther south, there may be no visible, no obvious wall. But there remain armed guards and checkpoints all the same—still a restriction on the right to travel, still an instrument to impose upon ordinary men and women the will of a totalitarian state. (14) Yet it is here in Berlin where the wall emerges most clearly; here, cutting across your city, where the news photo and the television screen have imprinted this brutal division of a continent upon the mind of the world. (15) Standing before the Brandenburg Gate, every man is a German, separated from his fellow men. Every man is a Berliner, forced to look upon a scar.

Which of the following sentences, if placed before sentence 12, would provide the most effective introduction to the topic of the paragraph? (5 points)

And yet, this one and only Berlin is not free.
For this reason, Berlin is a city with tight borders.
In fact, there is one thing that has helped to keep the city unique.
Many cities have erected walls, and Berlin is no different.
Take, for example, the Berlin Wall.

14.

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.

This passage is taken from a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.

“In the Reichstag a few moments ago, I saw a display commemorating this 40th anniversary of the Marshall Plan. I was struck by the sign on a burnt-out, gutted structure that was being rebuilt. I understand that Berliners of my own generation can remember seeing signs like it dotted throughout the western sectors of the city. The sign read simply: ‘The Marshall Plan is helping here to strengthen the free world.’ A strong, free world in the West, that dream became real. Japan rose from ruin to become an economic giant. Italy, France, Belgium—virtually every nation in Western Europe saw political and economic rebirth; the European Community was founded.”

In this paragraph, the speaker uses juxtaposition to contrast the (5 points)

economic growth around the world compared to Berlin
intricacies of the Marshall Plan with its actual effects
experience of destruction and ruin with that of rebirth and hope
past history of the Berlin Wall with the future of the new Berlin
expectation of economic growth with the statistical reality of it

15.

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.

This passage is taken from the concluding remarks of a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.

(11)And now the Soviets themselves may, in a limited way, be coming to understand the importance of freedom. We hear much from Moscow about a new policy of reform and openness. Some political prisoners have been released. Certain foreign news broadcasts are no longer being jammed. Some economic enterprises have been permitted to operate with greater freedom from state control.

(12)Are these the beginnings of profound changes in the Soviet state? Or are they token gestures, intended to raise false hopes in the West, or to strengthen the Soviet system without changing it? We welcome change and openness; for we believe that freedom and security go together, that the advance of human liberty can only strengthen the cause of world peace. There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable, that would advance dramatically the cause of freedom and peace.

(13)General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!

The intended audience can best be described as individuals who (5 points)

already advocate the complete removal of the Berlin Wall
fully support the preservation of the Berlin Wall
understand the historical importance of the Berlin Wall
may be persuaded to support the removal of the Berlin Wall
are apathetic to the plight of the Berliners and the Berlin wall

16.

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.

This passage is taken from the concluding remarks of a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.

(11)And now the Soviets themselves may, in a limited way, be coming to understand the importance of freedom. We hear much from Moscow about a new policy of reform and openness. Some political prisoners have been released. Certain foreign news broadcasts are no longer being jammed. Some economic enterprises have been permitted to operate with greater freedom from state control.

(12)Are these the beginnings of profound changes in the Soviet state? Or are they token gestures, intended to raise false hopes in the West, or to strengthen the Soviet system without changing it? We welcome change and openness; for we believe that freedom and security go together, that the advance of human liberty can only strengthen the cause of world peace. There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable, that would advance dramatically the cause of freedom and peace.

(13)General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!

In paragraph twelve, “freedom,” “security,” and “increased human liberties” suggest that (5 points)

the people of Berlin reject the implementation of these rights
the people of the West reject these values
these ideals are sure proof of Soviet advancements in human rights
these are the ideals that are valued by the West
these ideals are used by the Soviets to control the people of Berlin

17.

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.

This passage is taken from the concluding remarks of a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.

(11)And now the Soviets themselves may, in a limited way, be coming to understand the importance of freedom. We hear much from Moscow about a new policy of reform and openness. Some political prisoners have been released. Certain foreign news broadcasts are no longer being jammed. Some economic enterprises have been permitted to operate with greater freedom from state control.

(12)Are these the beginnings of profound changes in the Soviet state? Or are they token gestures, intended to raise false hopes in the West, or to strengthen the Soviet system without changing it? We welcome change and openness; for we believe that freedom and security go together, that the advance of human liberty can only strengthen the cause of world peace. There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable, that would advance dramatically the cause of freedom and peace.

(13)General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!

Which of the following best describes the shift in tone that occurs from paragraph 11 to paragraph 13? (5 points)

Compromising to factual
Hopeful to demanding
Apologetic to emotional
Accusing to flattering
Subtle to enthusiastic

18.

Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answer.

This passage is taken from the concluding remarks of a speech given by President Ronald Reagan to the people of West Berlin in 1987.

(11)And now the Soviets themselves may, in a limited way, be coming to understand the importance of freedom. We hear much from Moscow about a new policy of reform and openness. Some political prisoners have been released. Certain foreign news broadcasts are no longer being jammed. Some economic enterprises have been permitted to operate with greater freedom from state control.

(12)Are these the beginnings of profound changes in the Soviet state? Or are they token gestures, intended to raise false hopes in the West, or to strengthen the Soviet system without changing it? We welcome change and openness; for we believe that freedom and security go together, that the advance of human liberty can only strengthen the cause of world peace. There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable, that would advance dramatically the cause of freedom and peace.

(13)General Secretary Gorbachev, if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!

In paragraph 12, the speaker begins by posing two questions primarily to (5 points)

elaborate on the weak message that the changes convey
frighten the audience with the threat of extreme violence
ease the fears of the audience by revealing hopeful changes
highlight his suspicions of the sincerity behind these changes
illustrate the importance of strengthening Soviet power