How do you see your cultural background affecting your concept of life cycle? In other words, does your culture have some particular expectations for people at each stage of the life cycle?

Discussion 1:
How do you see your cultural background affecting your concept of life cycle? In other words, does your culture have some particular expectations for people at each stage of the life cycle? Please name and discuss two or three.
Note: I am Black/African American; stages to discuss is leaving home and coping with adolescence

Please use APA format and cite scholarly references; at least 250 words

Assignment will submitted for plagiarism

2-2a Family Life Cycle Stages
LO 3Recognize how individual family diversity may modify that family’s life cycle

Relationships between parents, siblings, and extended family members all undergo transitions as the family proceeds through the life cycle. Table 2.1 proposes a series of discrete stages, starting with single young adults leaving home, marrying, having children, launching those children into the world, and living together in later life. While the stages outlined obviously do not fit every family, especially considering our diverse society, the table draws attention to the multigenerational nature of family life as the family continues to change and evolve.

Table 2.1

Stages of the Family Life Cycle
Family Life Cycle Stage

Emotional Process of Transition: Key Principles

Second-Order Changes in Family Status Required to Proceed Developmentally

Leaving home: Emerging young adults

Accepting emotional and financial responsibility for self

1. Differentiation of self in relation to family of origin

2. Development of intimate peer relationships

3. Establishment of self in respect to work and financial independence

4. Establishment of self in community and larger society

5. Spirituality

Joining of families through marriage/union

Commitment to new system

1. Formation of partner systems

2. Realignment of relationships with extended family, friends, and larger community and social system to include new partners

Families with young children

Accepting new members into the system

1. Adjustment of couple system to make space for children

2. Collaboration in child-rearing, financial, and household tasks

3. Realignment of relationships with extended family to include parenting and grandparenting roles

4. Realignment of relationships with community and larger social system to include new family structure and relationships

Families with adolescents

Increasing flexibility of family boundaries to permit children’s independence and grandparents’ frailties

1. Shift of parent–child relationships to permit adolescent to move into and out of system

2. Refocus on midlife couple and career issues

3. Begin shift toward caring for older generation

4. Realignment with community and larger social system to include shifting family of emerging adolescent and parents in new formation pattern of relating

Launching children and moving on at midlife

Accepting a multitude of exits from and entries into the family system

1. Renegotiation of couple system as a dyad

2. Development of adult-to-adult relationships between parents and grown children

3. Realignment of relationships to include in-laws and grandchildren

4. Realignment of relationships with community and larger social system to include new structure and constellation of family relationships

5. Exploration of new interests/career given the freedom from child-care responsibilities

6. Dealing with care needs, disabilities, and death of parents (grandparents)

Families in late middle age

Accepting the shifting generational roles

1. Maintaining of own and/or couple functioning and interests in face of physiological decline: exploration of new familial and social role options

2. Support for more central role of middle generation

3. Realignment of the system in relation to community and larger social system to acknowledge changed pattern of family relationships at this stage

4. Making room in the system for the wisdom and experience of the elders

5. Supporting older generation without overfunctioning for them

Families nearing the end of life

Accepting the realities of limitations and death and the completion of one cycle of life

1. Dealing with loss of spouse, siblings, and other peers