PNU Health Promotion Strategy Plan and Materials about COVID19 Project

Assessment Task 7 – Final Report and Presentation: Health Promotion Strategy Plan and Materials Due Date: A. Presentation: Monday 6th December 2021 during topic. B. 8am Wednesday 8th December, 2021. This assignment is in TWO parts A) an individual assignment, and B) a group assignment. It builds on the previous group assignment and requires you to provide a detailed plan for implementation of ONE of the strategies from your group assignment. Each group member must choose a different strategy (i.e. one will discuss the ‘social marketing’ strategy, one will discuss ‘education for empowerment’ and one will discuss the ‘advocacy for healthy public policy strategy’). In addition to the plan you will be required to provide some ‘strategy materials’ that could be used to support your strategy. Details of task: The final report and presentation will include the: Brief description • Title page (see marking criteria for details) • Organisation – Logo, profile, mission (100 words max.) in A6 • Table of contents – include page number for each section and list of tables and figures • Introduction: identify the priority group; provide a brief overview of the issue to be addressed and a simple outline of the overall strategies outlined in your group assignment in (A6). (400 words). Overall project goal and objectives: List the goal, objectives, strategies and expected outcomes for your overall group project. You may wish to utilise the table you prepared for Assessment in A6. • of the task: • Strategy Description and Rationale: Provide a description of your individual strategy in detail including a discussion outlining any theory or evidence supporting your strategy. Include a brief discussion of expected outcomes that will result from your strategy. (my strategy is social Marketing *****youTube**** read the ppx to understand) • Implementation plan: A table which identifies the major tasks that need to be undertaken in order to implement your strategy (in chronological order). Include the time frame for each task. In ppx • Monitoring and Evaluation plan: A table or a narrative which outlines how you will monitor and evaluate your individual strategy including process and impact indicators. In ppx • Dissemination plan: A table or narrative which outlines how and where and with which audiences you will share the project evaluation findings in ppx • Media kit-your individual media release and the group background brief I uploaded the form of Media kit OCC413 AT7 Final Report & Presentation • Program materials to support your strategy. I made a youtube video took about 5 myth vs truth of COVID-19 The final strategy materials could include (but are not limited to) any of: • • • • • • • • • • magazine or newsletter (print or digital media), set of print resources (posters, pamphlets, education materials), a website, blog or online discussion/support group a short documentary (radio or video), feature article for news/current affairs (print) entertainment script and/or performance (short video/ music/theatre), art (photography, mural, graffiti, sculpture or an installation) an advertising or social marketing campaign (print, audio and/or video) formal letter/s and presentations to decision-makers plan for a community event and supporting resources to be used on the day. There is a great deal of scope for creativity in this task and ongoing feedback on your planning will be provided in tutorial workshops. Based on your research, each student will provide a) a full report (2,000 words, 30%) and b) the group will conduct a 15 minute presentation (10%) which summarises tasks A6. 2,000 word report (individual) (30%); and Word limit: 15 minute (group) presentation (10%) 40% of final grade: Weighting: Presentation requirements: Estimated return date: Marking Criteria: • 2,000 word report (individual) = 30% • 15 minute presentation (group) = 10% Report format. Three weeks from the date of submission. See marking criteria sheet below. OCC413 AT7 Final Report & Presentation Helpful Tips to be used for AT7: Resource: Strategy material ideas for AT7 • • • • • • • • magazine or newsletter (print or digital media), c set of print resources (posters, pamphlets, education materials), a website, blog or online discussion/support group a short documentary (radio or video), feature article for news/current affairs (print) entertainment script and/or performance (short video/ music/theatre), art (photography, mural, graffiti, sculpture or an installation) an advertising or social marketing campaign (print, audio and/or video). Some examples that are particularly relevant for the individual objectives are:cccccc Social marketing a series of radio advertisements (30 seconds each approx) a television advertisement (60 seconds approx.) a song or musical piece to promote the campaign (recorded or live performance) a resources pack containing pamphlet/ information booklet, stickers and posters Note: there are numerous other ideas in the readings for this topic Education for empowerment not my stratgy a short video documentary about the issue or people affected by the issue (5-10mins) a plan for an empowerment education program (highlighting the empowerment principles and activities) a community art or photovoice program and exhibition plan (see readings) a support group/online resource centre using social media a poster advertising a support group a sample cookbook (or other learning resource) that has been created by project participants Note: there are numerous other ideas in the readings for this topic Advocacy not my stratgy OCC413 AT7 Final Report & Presentation a feature article on the issue for a newspaper or school newsletter a mock up of an online petition a letter to a politician or decision-maker in government or an organisation. a website a radio (5 mins max) or short video documentary (10 mins approx.) Note: there are numerous other ideas in the readings for this topi AT7 Resource: Tips for AT7 1. General • TEAMWORK: Please try to get together at least once outside of class to ensure the different strategies in your program all fit together well. Plan for the AT7 presentation: all tasks are listed, people and timelines are allocated. • LEARN FROM OTHERS: Look at the previous student AT7 REPORTS available on Blackboard or from your tutor. • LANGUAGE & TONE: Think of this as a professional report rather than a student assignment. Remember that this isn’t an essay; it’s a report detailing the plan for a program. To help with getting the tone right, imagine you are writing it for a funding body in order to convince them to your project is worthy of funding and support. • PROGRAM IDENTITY: Ensure you foreground your program’s name, logo, your slogan or some other form of ‘branding’ on all documents in the assignment. • USE AT6 FEEDBACK: Please read carefully over the feedback provided on your AT6. Use this feedback to help you strengthen your AT7. 2. Introduction ‘Succinct overview of priority group, issue and range of group strategies from AT6’ OCC413 AT7 Final Report & Presentation Identify the issue/problem and the target group first up. Use information from your AT2 Mission statement and organisational profile to help you. Avoid long drawn-out essay-style writing. Definitions of key terms are OK (e.g. what is bullying?) but make them brief. Remember to identify the three group strategies from AT6 that are used in your integrated health promotion program 3. Program Overview: Goal, objectives, strategies and outcomes This section should be a snapshot of the whole program. You can use the information from the equivalent section in AT6. Check that: • The GOAL is general and encompasses the overarching health and related goals. • OBJECTIVES are specific, measurable, time-limited etc (SMART). • Remember: You need to match EVERY objective with a strategy and brief list of components within this strategy. • The objectives must be NUMBERED. Ensure the ‘expected changes’ as a result of each strategy are clearly stated and logically linked to objectives. You may wish to use a table like the one beneath This is an example only. There are many different ways to present this – so if yours is good, stick with it. Goal Objective Strategy 1. Info and Social marketing pamphlets/posters media ads website Expected outcome (level of change) Individuals Change in awareness, attitudes, beliefs, intention to change behaviours, attendance at program 2. Advocacy Media: Radio report Feature article Organisations Policy change by decisionmakers in organisations and government Community Action: Public meetings Petitions Write to decisionmakers Community Put pressure on decisionmakers OCC413 AT7 Final Report & Presentation 3. • Personal stories Health Ed. and Empowerment Workshops Training leaders Peer leaders Ambassadors from target group Community action groups Community Working together to help each other take control and solve this problem from the ground up. The best AT7s briefly outline what an ‘Integrated Health Promotion Plan’ actually is (using references from topics 1, 2 &3) and include some theory about why is it more effective than single strategies. 4. Strategy details and rationale This section should ONLY focus on the strategy for which YOU have taken the major responsibility for development of the detailed strategy plan (Social marketing, Education for empowerment, or Advocacy). • • • The best ATs provide a clear subheading e.g. ‘Advocacy Strategy’. Then provide a strategy definition, rationale for using this strategy, expected outcomes, key theory, principles and/or frameworks. Use references. Link to the theory and frameworks in the readings & lectures. Demonstrate you haven’t just dreamed it all up off the top if your head. Then outline the strategy components and materials. • • Provide ‘full list’ of components that you would like to include in the advocacy strategy (e.g. in a table or dot point list) Then describe in detail the ‘strategy components and final materials’ that you have actually developed for this report and what you expect them to achieve. Here are some examples of how you might structure this section. Examples of ‘digital materials’ are suggested below but please also use the list to help you come up with your own ideas. If you’re unsure, discuss your ideas with your tutor. Strategy 1 Social marketing ( • • • Detailed social marketing strategy plan (using worksheets and/or other resources) Component strategy materials: e.g. series of 3 x 30 second radio ads or a resources pack containing pamphlet/ information booklet, stickers and posters. Expected outcome: raise awareness; change attitudes; stimulate public discussion, increase individual’s interest in seeking assistance/services (e.g. helpline). OCC413 AT7 Final Report & Presentation • How will it do this: reaching specific audience segments with targeted messages to influence their thinking and behaviour; help set the scene for supportive social context for EE strategy and/or Advocacy policy change strategy? OR: Strategy 2 Education for empowerment • • • • Detailed education for empowerment strategy plan (using worksheets and/or other resources) Component strategy materials: e.g. short video documentary about the issue or person affected by the issue (5mins) or a Support group/online resource centre using social media Expected outcome: communities and their people empowered to create change. How will it do this: trigger for discussion in workshops; raise critical consciousness; encourage participation in support groups and/or community action etc OR: Strategy 3: Advocacy • • • • • Detailed advocacy strategy plan (using worksheets and/or other resources) Component materials developed: e.g. feature article for newspaper + online petition. Expected outcome: progress toward policy change. How will it do this: raise awareness, increase public support for policy change, stimulate public debate, more signatures on online petition, greater lobbying power etc. Please see more information on AT7 digital materials below. 5. Implementation plan ‘Actions are itemised in logical order, showing sound understanding of steps required, with practical time frames’ A table is probably the best way to present this information. Make sure you include all the steps in chronological order, the time frame and the person responsible. See lecture on topic 3 for a sample table. 6. Monitoring and Evaluation plan ‘Clearly outlines appropriate methods to monitor and evaluate the individual strategy which includes practical and well aligned process and impact indicators’ OCC413 AT7 Final Report & Presentation Most students would include a table and narrative in this section but the format is up to you. The main thing is to ensure that you include both process indicators (measurement of project progress and methods along the way) and impact indicators (changes you expect to achieve) that logically align with your strategies. You also need to discuss the type of methods you will use to monitor and evaluate your strategy. A good student would back their methodology up with appropriate evidence and theory. Refer to the topic 9 tutorial for further resources. Dissemination plan: Outline a list/table of how you will share your evaluation findings once you have implemented and evaluated your program. Outline to which stakeholder groups, in what form, how &/or where you will disseminate this information 7. Media kit Review the criteria for ‘Assessment Task 4’ and the ‘checklist for a good media release’ from the topic 10 tutorial and check that your media kit complies. Remember to include a media release AND a background brief. These should be approximately 200 words each. Make sure it is newsworthy and that is related to your individual strategy. If necessary, the Media Kit can go in an Appendix. 8. Strategy materials: important information about audio, video and websites Final Materials can either be included/uploaded in the • AT7 Report Appendices (same file please) or • Separate files (such as pdf, audio mp3 and video mp4 or equivalent). • Websites, social media sites or blogs can be provided via a link with password OR as a file containing all screen shots. You cannot make these publicly available (ie. an open website). Guidelines are available to help you with creating social media sites/blogs for university assignments that are limited/private or password protected. Please see Blackboard or your tutor. If it’s helpful, use the templates (worksheets) from the relevant weeks to provide a framework for summarising the steps you have used to inform the development of your materials. Students, who use these, often put the completed template (worksheet) in an Appendix. Microsoft Publisher. This is a great program for making pamphlets and booklets etc. These can be created in Publisher and then saved as a pdf for uploading. Under international copyright laws, you are only permitted to use photos, music, or creative works by other people in the educational context of an assignment at PNU. You cannot make the new materials publicly available (i.e. YouTube upload; an open website). 9. Tables and figures Be brief. Tables are not a ‘word sink’ for anything you can’t fit in, they are a succinct summary. They must make sense to the reader, so check your table carefully to be sure it doesn’t reveal a messy planning process. OCC413 AT7 Final Report & Presentation All tables and figures should have a number and title and acknowledge the source. eg. Table 1. Determinants of mental health for adolescent males Adapted from Lewis and Joyce (2012) 10. Appendices Appendices are a good way of staying under the word count. They must be numbered and labelled (and listed in the Table of Contents). OCC413 AT7 Final Report & Presentation AT7 Marking Criteria (Final Report) Criteria Title page Weight A B C D F Hurdle Title page including title of overall program, authorization (report commissioned by…), author, contributors (group members names and student IDs), date of completion, acknowledgements Organisation (100 words max.) Hurdle Table of contents Hurdle List of assignment sections with page numbers. List of any figures and tables with page numbers. List of Appendices. Logo, profile, mission Introduction 5% Succinct overview of priority group, issue and range of group strategies from AT6 Clear overview of priority group, issue and strategies Statement of priority group, issue and strategies, but scope for greater clarity May or may not identify priority group and/or issue and/or strategies from group assignment. May lack clarity in one or more of these. Failure to identify priority group and/or issue and/or strategies from group assignment. Lack of clarity in all or most of these. Goal, objectives, strategies and outcomes of overall group program 5% Goal and objectives are all written in SMART format. Strategies and project outcomes are clearly stated and logically linked to objectives. Accurate understanding of what goal and objectives are, but a few are not SMART. One or more strategies or project outcomes may lack clarity or logic. Understanding shown of what goal and objectives are, is mostly correct, with some not suitable and a number needing to be more SMART. Several strategies or project outcomes lack clarity and/or logic. Goal and objectives provided, but up to half do not show an understanding of what these are and need to be more SMART. Most strategies and/or project outcomes lack clarity and/or logic. Poor understanding of goal and objectives. SMART criteria are not addressed. Strategies and project outcomes not mentioned or lack clarity. OCC413 AT7 Final Report & Presentation Strategy description and Rationale 15% Very clear description of strategy components and logical outcomes. Several logical reasons given to provide a rationale for strategy which are well supported with theory and /or evidence. Demonstrates in depth understanding. Clear description of strategy components and logical outcomes. Some reasons given to provide a rationale for strategy with reasonable support from evidence and/or theory. Demonstrates good understanding Description of strategy components and/or outcomes needs more detail, logic or clarity. Describes some reasons for strategy but analysis lacks depth. May provide some supportive evidence and/or theory. Strategy and/or expected outcomes are not clear to the reader. Describes one or two reasons for strategy but description may not be clear and fails to provide analysis or consider complexities. Inadequate description of strategy. Fails to give logical reasons for strategy and fails to provide supportive theory or evidence. Implementation Plan 10% Actions are itemised in logical order, showing sound understanding of steps required, with practical time frames Actions are itemised in logical order, with steps mostly complete, time frames are mostly practical Actions are in logical order, with several steps missing, and time frames needing improvement in several places Actions are given, but order is not consistently logical with a number of steps missing, and time frames could be improved in a number of places Fails to provide a timeline or it is significantly lacking in detail Monitoring and evaluation plan. 10% Clearly outlines appropriate methods to monitor and evaluate the individual strategy which includes practical and well Reasonable outline of methods to monitor and evaluate the project and indicators are Mentions some monitoring and evaluation methods and indicators but needs more detail, clarity, Monitoring and evaluation plan lacks clarity and/or sufficient detail. Indicators may or may not be mentioned and most are not Fails to provide monitoring and evaluation plan and/or indicators and is significantly lacking in clarity and detail OCC413 AT7 Final Report & Presentation Dissemination plan for Evaluation findings 5% aligned process and impact indicators Clearly outlines a multi-faceted plan which explains how evaluation findings will be disseminated to meet the needs of different stakeholders Meets all criteria very well: Catchy title, clear language, newsworthy, includes key information and appropriate quotes, provides contact details mostly practical well aligned alignment and practicality well aligned or practical. Outlines how evaluation findings will be disseminated and considers the needs of various stakeholders Describes how findings will be disseminated but fails to consider needs of different stakeholders Description of how findings will be disseminated lacks clarity and fails to consider needs of different stakeholders Fails to outline how evaluation findings will be disseminated Meets most of the criteria well Meets some of the criteria reasonably well Meets a few criteria but could be stronger Fails to meet criteria Media kit-press release (200 words) 5% Media kit-background brief (200 words) 5% Meets all criteria very well: Clear language, logical flow, relevant literature Meets most of the criteria well Meets some of the criteria reasonably well Meets a few criteria but could be stronger Fails to meet criteria Strategy materials 30% Clearly matches the objective/s and strategy plan Clear communication of key messages appropriate for Matches objectives and plan reasonably well. Communicates some key Mostly matches objectives and plan Communicates a few key messages and is somewhat Partially matches objectives and plan Could be more appropriate for intended audience Materials do not match objectives and plan Not appropriate for intended audience OCC413 AT7 Final Report & Presentation intended audience/s Outstanding production quality, presentation, originality and creativity messages and mostly appropriate for intended audience High production quality, presentation, originality and creativity appropriate for intended audience. Reasonable production quality, presentation, originality and creativity Low production quality, presentation, originality and creativity Very poor production quality, presentation and lacking in originality and creativity Extensive range of appropriate and reliable literature utilised. Correct use of APA 6 referencing and citation Good range of references, from diverse sources, with minor errors in format, APA6 referencing or citation style. Adequate range of references, most sources reliable and occasional errors in format, APA6 referencing or citation style. Limited range of references, some sources not reliable and significant errors in format, APA6 referencing or citation style. Very limited range of references, few reliable sources utilised, significant errors in format, APA6 referencing or citation style. Clear structure and logical flow Very well written, easy to read, and logical throughout Generally very clear and logically structured Information readable, but need better flow and logical structure Information presented, but need significant improvements in clarity and logic Information lacking in clarity and difficult to follow logic Presentation, spelling and grammar High standard of writing, with few if any errors in spelling, grammar Generally well written, with occasional errors and difficulties in sentence construction Passages that read well but other areas with difficult to follow expressions, grammatical and spelling errors Some sections of clear writing and correct grammar, but significant areas with poor expression Large sections of the essay with poor expression, incorrect spelling and incorrect grammar making it difficult for the reader to follow Academic writing 10% TOTAL 100% OCC413 AT7 Final Report & Presentation AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 1 AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan By: Aisha Al Aanazi, Gadeer Medshel, Haneen Saleh, Rana Al Shahrani, Reem Al Nafea Health Promotion [OCC413] Princess Nourah University Dr. Salwa Awad 2 AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 3 Table of content: Section Page NO. 1. Organization overview 4 2. Background literature review and rationale for the program 4 3. Community assessment / ‘needs’ analysis 7 4. Goals and objectives 8 5. Objectives presented in SMART format 8 6. Partnerships and community engagement/ communication 9 7. Strategic overview 10 8. Implementation and monitoring plan 11 9. Sustainability 12 References list 13 Appendix A: Personal reflection (assessment of group work) 15 Appendix B: Group work declaration 17 AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 4 1. Organization overview 1.1. Organization name “Your Fear Is Valid” is an organization that is meant to address the psychological and emotional distress caused by and associated with SARS-CoV-2/COVID 19 vaccine hesitancy. 1.2. Rational and mission statement Anxiety level has increased worldwide because of the sudden shocking events of the COVID-19 pandemic, which caused tremendous psychological distress which results in many people being anxious and hesitating in taking the Coronavirus vaccine and suspecting its efficacy. Vaccine hesitancy can be defined as the delay in accepting or refusing vaccines despite the availability of vaccine services that have since begun to exist in abundance in the community worldwide in the rea of the COVID-19 pandemic (Adhikari and Cheah, 2021). In 2019, the World Health Organization identified vaccine hesitancy as one of the top ten global health threats (Bendau et al., 2021). Hence, the mission of this organization is to decrease the level of anxiety among the Saudi population to increase the number of vaccinated individuals, and in result, it will promote the mental, physical, and well-being of public health. 1.3. Organizational profile Chief Executive Officer (CEO): Aisha Al Anazi Chief Financial Officer (CFO): Haneen Saleh Community Liaison Manager: Reem Al Nafea Public Relations/Social Media Manager: Rana Al Shahrani Data collection: Gadeer Medshel All members are occupational therapy students and therefore they understand and recognize the importance of engaging in the community without fears, and they have the skills to facilitate health promotion action. 2. Background literature review and rationale for the program 2.1. Evidence of the problem: With the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, many unfortunate events in Saudi Arabia have occurred resulting in an increased burden on the government, societal, and personal levels. The importance of addressing these issues to contribute to limiting the spread of the virus and reducing distress, anxiety, mental instability, and concerns regarding the pandemic, has become a priority. Many studies found that mental instability and general distress are one of the many problems arising during the pandemic leading to anxiety and hesitancy regarding the vaccine which in return AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 5 limited the numbers of vaccinated individuals and increase the spread of the Coronavirus putting the public health at huge risk (Bendau et al., 2021). 2.2. Determinants of the problem: Vaccination is critical for limiting the spread of the SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to the development and supply of vaccines, a sufficient number of people must be willing to be vaccinated, but alarming proportions of populations worldwide are hesitant to get the vaccine. Hence, it is critical to identify the factors associated with vaccine acceptance (Bendau et al., 2021). The rapid pandemic led to many consecutive shocking events, one of which is the quarantine phase. During the quarantine, people were panicking and were confused about what is happening and whether there is going to be a vaccine or not. All these sudden events have negatively impacted the mental health of people worldwide. Some people developed anxiety and fear of the outside, the future, and the mysterious vaccine. Furthermore, after Scientists understood the virus and developed the vaccine, and was then available to the entire population, many incorrect rumors and myths were spread about it which caused an increased amount of anxiety and fear. Many problems have arisen among the Saudi population during the pandemic affecting the health and well-being of the public. A study conducted in 2021 concluded that curfews, closures, and social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic contributed to reducing the disease’s spread across Saudi Arabia; nonetheless, they may result in many psychological disorders such as anxiety, depression, panic disorder, and emotional distress (Elhessewi at el., 2021). With regard to deteriorating mental health during the pandemic, many people are panicking and anxious about getting vaccinated which led to a decrease in the number of vaccinated individuals. Since a major global effort has been made to develop a vaccine to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, several incidents of vaccine hesitation have been reported in Saudi Arabia putting public health at risk (Al-Mohaithef at el., 2020). The most given reasons of refusal have been identified to be concerns about safety, in other words, people believe that because the vaccine was made in a hurry, therefore, they have doubts about the efficacy of the vaccine, also they think that the vaccine is useless due to the harmless nature of COVID-19 (Magadmi et al., 2020). These issues put public health at great risk as anxiety and fear about the vaccine caused a declined acceptance rate and decreased vaccinated individuals which in turn caused it to be one of the top ten public health threats according to the World Health Organization (Paul et al., 2021). Other factors include socio-demographic factors, that is, females and younger individuals have a lower tendency to take the vaccine. In addition, distrust of research regarding the vaccine and the vaccine itself due to rapid development and negative side effects has spread among the population. To sum up, it is critical to identify factors for vaccination willingness for the development of interventions to decrease vaccination hesitancy (Bendau et al., 2021). In addition, research has discovered that there are myriad factors associated with a great susceptibility to COVID-19 misinformation, including vaccine misinformation. These involve the usage of social media as a key source of information and having a decreased level of trust in scientists. The AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 6 general misconceptions about COVID-19 vaccines have included false claims about their safety, effectiveness, ingredients, side effects, and the purpose of the vaccine (Nuzhath et al., 2020). 2.3. Evidence of interventions: Issue Intervention Content of the intervention Year Effectiveness Reduce the fear Results from a study found that 2021 From a psychological perspective and and panic observing friends and family getting according prevalent in vaccinated may reduce anxiety and experiment, conformity bias or group Saudi Arabia increase through pressure has been proven to be highly during the conformist bias. By observing others effective in changing someone’s personal pandemic and who are healthy following vaccination, judgment. People are most likely to act in help people hesitant people are less likely to be prosocial behavior when the see/hear others manage their anxious about potential negative side doing the same thing (Mcleod, 2018). anxieties and effects of the vaccine. Therefore, Moreover, stress and anxiety management concerns Interventions should take the form of strategies such as early identification of regarding the reviving confidence in national health vulnerable communities, decent induction, vaccine. authorities and demonstrating how active participation, sufficient explanation, people remain healthy after vaccination recognition, effective communication, and this will then improve public perception psychological help available whenever about needed, can significantly control stress and purpose 1) Anxiety vaccine the develop uptake vaccine. awareness Additionally, campaigns to Solomon Asch’s line to anxiety. It can also sustain a strong provide information on anxiety and workforce against forthcoming waves of distress management strategies to better COVID-19 (Boktor et al., 2020). control the physiological state of individuals (Salali and Uysal, 2021). 2) Misinformation Filing the According to the Centers for Disease about COVID-19 knowledge gaps Control (CDC), to correct the spread of misinformation vaccination and addressing misinformation about the Covid-19 COVID-19 and its vaccine is being spread misinformation vaccine there should be monitoring of and shared through social media (Loomba et with evidence- social media, identifying information al., 2021). This intervention targets the main based gaps, and filling these gaps with the source messaging from correct information, making the correct therefore, it will be effective in correcting reliable sources. and wrong information and vanishing myths recent information about Coronavirus accessible and available at all times for all individuals in the community (CDC, 2021). Furthermore, public awareness campaigns aim to providing clear information about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines, as 2021 According to a recent study, most of the of the and issue myths regarding (misinformation) about the efficacy of the vaccine. AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 7 well as the technology used in their production, must be carried out. (Salali and Uysal, 2021). 3) Low number of Advocating for Developing awareness campaigns to vaccinated the importance promote the importance of reaching out proven to be effective in increasing the individuals of taking the to take the vaccine, and how vaccination population acceptance and wiliness to get COVID-19 will help in enhancing the control of this vaccinated and thus decrease the burden on vaccine to pandemic and the public well-being. the government (Mannan and Farhana, increase the These 2020). number of government’s intervention, assistance in vaccinated gaining the public’s trust, increasing individuals community awareness, and working to campaigns need the 2021 Awareness campaigns have been done and increase community confidence in the vaccine through continuous communication with the population regarding Coronavirus; in other words, the government must maintain communication with the community when any new events occur to sustain confidence (OECD, 2021). To sum up, after implementing strategies for addressing COVID-19 vaccine misinformation and anxiety associated with vaccination hesitancy in the Saudi community, the number of vaccinated people will increase, and public health will improve. 3. Community assessment / ‘needs’ analysis Data should be collected about the population to better understand peoples’ attitude, their level of knowledge, and address their needs, therefore, many assessments must be conducted (AISF, 2020). For example, Quality of Life (QoL) assessment across multiple domains aids in the identification of a wide range of issues that can impact people’s daily lives such as the accruing of disturbing events during the Covid-19 pandemic (Algahtani et al., 2021). Identifying such issues helps in identifying the needs of the community, hence, choosing appropriate interventions for the community. Another assessment tool that was used to assess depression, anxiety, and stress after the pandemic is The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale–21 (DASS-21) (Algahtani et al., 2021). This assessment would be useful in measuring the level of anxiety among people who are hesitant to take the vaccine. Another similar assessment that can help in addressing distress associated with the Coronavirus is the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (PDS) which was used to measure psychological distress among research participants, and it was discovered that more than one-third of the study population suffer from various levels of psychological distress (Elhessewi at AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 8 el., 2021). Furthermore, according to Loomba et al., there is no quantitative assessment for assessing the impact of misinformation regarding Covid-19 on vaccination hesitancy (2021). However, an online survey could be used to measure the Saudi population’s level of knowledge about Coronavirus and its vaccine. 4. Goals and objectives Overall goal: Increase the amount of covid-19 vaccinated individual by decreasing anxiety Objective 1 Level of change The anxiety and fear level of the Individual level Expected outcomes Public mental health will be enhanced, and vaccine will decrease among Saudi people will become more aware of anxiety individuals factors which will reduce their anxiety about the vaccine Objective 2 Level of change The number of vaccinated Government level individuals in Saudi Arabia will Expected outcomes Public health will be improved and the burden on health sectors will be decreased increase Objective 3 Level of change The spread of Community level misinformation/misunderstanding Expected outcomes People will be convinced about the importance and need of the vaccine about COVID-19 vaccination in the Saudi community will be corrected 5. Objectives presented in SMART format Component of smart Objective 1: The anxiety Objective 2: The number of Objective 3: The spread of goal and fear level of the vaccinated individuals in Saudi misinformation/misunderstanding vaccine will decrease Arabia will increase about COVID-19 vaccination in the among Saudi individuals Specific Saudi community will be corrected The target type of anxiety This objective is specific to Specific to misunderstanding about is anxiety associated with individuals living in Saudi Arabia COVID-19 vaccination Survey based on DASS-21 The number of vaccinated people will Conducting a pre-implementation assessment be detected through the constant survey and a post-implementation vaccination Measurable survey, then compare it to each other AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan Achievable 9 updates announced by the ministry of to measure the difference in the health (MOH) community’s level of knowledge This objective will be Advocate for people to reach out to • implemented through their nearest medical center as the information will be published by social media platforms to vaccine is provided in every medical reliable sources through different educate individuals about center in Saudi Arabia platforms that can be easily anxiety management The survey and the correct accessible by the community. • strategies The awareness campaign will include only booklets and posts on social media; therefore, it is easily achievable. Relevant As shown in the evidence Taking into account the current According to the evidence above, with of the issue above, anxiety circumstances, COVID-19 is the the sudden epidemic wave there has is a major barrier in the main threat to public health and to the been a widespread of misinformation face of vaccination against government’s economics in the Saudi community This objective will be The number of vaccinated individuals The campaign will run for 3 months implemented within 3 will significantly increase within 3 weeks maximum months Coronavirus Time Bound 6. Partnerships and community engagement/ communication The key partners in relation to COVID-19 issues include researchers, counselors, and psychologists, anxiety sufferers, CDC, World Health Organization, Psychiatrists/physicians as well as the public in Saudi Arabia. Researchers have engaged the public with knowledge regarding Coronavirus which has been attributed to negative health effects to individuals. They have engaged the victims in stress reduction activities, not to go beyond the CDC guidelines and to preserve some sense of normalcy (Algahtani et al., 2021). Counselors and psychologists have given engage to the general public on how to deal with COVID-19 issues such as depression, anxiety, and stress (Algahtani et al., 2021). Anxiety sufferers, however, are advised to seek medical attention if the situation worsens. They need to learn about how to protect themselves from anxiety and other mental health issues. Again, they can seek out for professional help when facing difficulties. CDC have imposed guidelines on how to deal with mental health issues and to stay safe from COVID-19 problems. On the other hand, the World Health Organization have set forums through which matters concerning the Coronavirus pandemic can be discussed to eradicate it’s negative health effects to the general public (Algahtani et al., 2021). Lastly, a psychiatrist can prescribe medication for anxiety, depression, and insomnia (Li et al.,2020). Strategic overview AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 10 Strategy type Chosen strategy Social Advertisements on the efficacy of the vaccine would help in attracting more people to get vaccinated. In the modern Marketing era of media reliance on information, a significant population would likely conform to the perceived norms, especially those promoted on media platforms. Encouraging similar discussions on social media would also lower the anxiety associated with experiencing the vaccine’s side effects. Education for Creating easy-to-access sites that provide reliable and factual information about the spread of Covid-19 will greatly Empowerment reduce misinformation. For example, validating information in social media will help prevent misinformation from being shared. Additionally, the heavy presence of institutions such as the CDC on heavily contested topics would help in guiding people towards reliable data sources. In turn, the health sector would realize considerable success in promoting an understanding of the vaccines` importance. Advocacy Awareness campaigns are important for promoting and understanding of the vaccine`s importance to the public. The strategy should involve looking back at measures taken to prevent misinformation while guiding people on the benefits of vaccines to public health. The concept would reveal the performance of other measures put in place to fight the pandemic. Additionally, they would show the extent to which vaccines would boost those efforts. Social media can be an instrumental strategy in this approach due to its ability to spread information fast and the level of trust with which people welcome views on social platforms. 6.1. How the strategies complement each other The strategies will complement each other to achieve primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of health promotion, leading to long-term goals (WHO, 2013). For the strategies to be more effective, there is a need to integrate the community to develop more skills and gain more knowledge. Once the community is involved, the members tend to support all the interventions since they feel they are part of it. Hence, combining social marketing advocacy and education for empowerment will increase health awareness (Department of Health, 2012). Such stratification will help clear out all the misunderstandings and misconception concerning the vaccine. It will change people’s attitude towards that intervention increasing the likelihood of more people being vaccinated. It will then reduce fear and anxiety that is prevailing on Covid 19 vaccine. 6.2. Strategy rational for each objective Objective: The anxiety and fear level of the vaccine will decrease among Saudi individuals The rational: The world has already shared information biased on Covid-19 vaccine, and education on how effective the vaccine can be to society needs to be preached. Giving the community the right education can reduce their anxiety towards the vaccine and make the right decisions for their families and themselves (Cylus & Panteli, 2021). Creating awareness of the effectiveness of the vaccine by giving people the right information about it, they will develop trust and confidence and make the right decision of being vaccinated. Also, reducing barriers by educating the society and giving them the correct sources of information about the vaccines and the way they can get them (El-Elimat et al, nd). AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 11 Objective: The number of vaccinated individuals in Saudi Arabia will increase The rational: Acceptance and uptake of vaccines can be aided by social marketing. It provides a method for developing interventions that result in measurable behavioral change, which benefits both individuals and society. Social marketing is a discipline that combines commercial marketing tactics with social and behavioral science theories to identify and address the motivations and barriers to change within a specific audience (Opel & Diekema, 2009). Objective: The spread of misinformation/misunderstanding about COVID-19 vaccination in the Saudi community will be corrected. The rational: Accessing communities and local resources, as well as demonstrating the program’s accountability, are all part of the advocacy strategy which is based on a clear vision with defined objectives and attainable goals. When drawing a plan to fight or bring about regulations, it is easy for them to fail without a strategic plan to kickstart and maintain its set pace. From the beginning is good for the organization to set regulations to know where they are and where they are aiming to go, and that will make them maintain the momentum set at the start. For a successful advocacy campaign, it is good to determine a clear objective, doing thorough research to make sure everything is clear and any activity around the plan is clear; for a successful campaign, there must be a focused building of relationships, driving change through social media passing rich information about the campaign, converting national issues to local ones, and lastly using the right data for the research (Criss & Nguyen, 2021). 7. Implementation and monitoring plan Social marketing, advocacy, and education for empowerment are more effective when applied at the same time. Through 10 sessions, education for empowerment, and social marketing strategy will assist in achieving to increase awareness about the importance of the vaccine to reduce the spread of COVID-19 by 6 months. However, for actions like advertisements in social media they will continue for more time to reach larger audiences. Combining education for empowerment and social marketing strategy will successfully lead to better advocacy. The advocacy strategy will be the last strategy. AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 12 7.1. Strategies’ timeline Strategy Timeline Education for empowerment 10 sessions Implementation Creating easy -to -access sites with correct Reevaluating the information to curtail misinformation about number of people COVID-19. Social marketing 3 months Evaluation vaccinated Use of social media advertising to help in Carrying out surveys attracting more people to get vaccinated on different social media platforms Advocacy 6 months Awareness campaigns on the importance of Survey on the number vaccination. of people vaccinated. 8. Sustainability The program of administering vaccines and making people change their thought about it can only be maintained by eliminating the sources giving false information about the Covid-19 vaccine and empowering people to make the right decisions for their families. The government should fund the organization that has taken the step to create awareness on why people should be vaccinated against the virus. Doing so will motivate them, and they will try to reach as many people as possible. Government should develop regulations that will ensure everybody gets equal treatment when it comes to vaccination (Kitney & Bell, 2021). People should also be trained to accept processes set by the government to ensure the entire country’s safety. Government should request facilities from schools and hotels where there is a large turnout to ensure the vaccine is available to everybody even without attending health centers. Families and friends should be encouraged to spread the gospel to convince others why they should be vaccinated against the Coronavirus. Social media platforms should offer free advertisement for the promotions targeted to communicate about the Coronavirus. The platforms themselves should create a well-seen post to encourage people to go for vaccines. AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 13 Reference Adhikari, B., & Cheah, P. Y. (2021). Vaccine hesitancy in the COVID-19 era. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 21(8), 1086. Al-Mohaithef, M., & Padhi, B. K. (2020). Determinants of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance in Saudi Arabia: a webbased national survey. Journal of multidisciplinary healthcare, 13, 1657. Algahtani, F. D., Hassan, S.-un-N., Alsaif, B., & Zrieq, R. (2021). Assessment of the quality of life during COVID19 pandemic: A cross-sectional survey from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(3), 847. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18030847 Bendau, A., Plag, J., Petzold, M. B., & Ströhle, A. (2021). COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and related fears and anxiety. International Immunopharmacology, 97, 107724. doi:10.1016/j.intimp.2021.107724 Boktor, J., Gwyn, R., Gonzi, G., Kumar, A., Roy, K., Rooney, K., & Pullen, H. (2020). Stress and Anxiety Management During the COVID-19 Pandemic (Lessons Learnt from a Cohort of Orthopaedic Registrars Redeployed to ITU). Ortopedia, traumatologia, rehabilitacja, 22(5), 303–309. https://doi.org/10.5604/01.3001.0014.4211 Criss, S., Nguyen, T. T., Norton, S., Virani, I., Titherington, E., Tillmanns, E. L., … & Gee, G. C. (2021). Advocacy, Hesitancy, and Equity: Exploring US Race-Related Discussions of the COVID-19 Vaccine on Twitter. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(11), 5693 Cylus, J., Panteli, D., & van Ginneken, E. (2021). Who should be vaccinated first? Comparing vaccine prioritization strategies in Israel and European countries using the Covid-19 Health System Response Monitor. Israel journal of health policy research, 10(1), 1-3. Department of Health. (2012). Integrated health promotion: A practice guide for service providers (pp. 106). Melbourne, Australia: Victorian Government Department of Human Services. Elhessewi, G. M. S., Almoayad, F., Mahboub, S., Alhashem, A. M., & Fiala, L. (2021). Psychological distress and its risk factors during COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional study. Middle East Current Psychiatry, 28(1), 1-7. Kessler RC, Andrews G, Colpe LJ, Hiripi E, Mroczek DK, Normand S-L et al (2002) Short screening scales to monitor population prevalences and trends in non-specific psychological distress. Psychol Med 32(6):959– 976 Li, Y., Qin, Q., Sun, Q., Sanford, L. D., Vgontzas, A. N., & Tang, X. (2020). Insomnia and psychological reactions during the COVID-19 outbreak in China. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 16(8), 1417-1418. Loomba, S., de Figueiredo, A., Piatek, S. J., de Graaf, K., & Larson, H. J. (2021). Measuring the impact of COVID-19 vaccine misinformation on vaccination intent in the UK and USA. Nature human behaviour, 5(3), 337-348. Magadmi, R. M., & Kamel, F. O. (2021). Beliefs and barriers associated with COVID-19 vaccination among the general population in Saudi Arabia. BMC Public Health, 21(1), 1-8. Mannan, D. K. A., & Farhana, K. M. (2020). Knowledge, attitude and acceptance of a COVID-19 vaccine: A global cross-sectional study. International Research Journal of Business and Social Science, 6(4) Nuzhath, T., Tasnim, S., Sanjwal, R. K., Trisha, N. F., Rahman, M., Mahmud, S. F., … & Hossain, M. M. (2020). COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy, misinformation and conspiracy theories on social media: A content analysis of Twitter data. Paul, E., Steptoe, A., & Fancourt, D. (2021). The Lancet Regional Health—Europe Attitudes towards vaccines and intention to vaccinate against COVID-19: Implications for public health communications. Lancet Reg. Health Eur, 1. Salali, G. D., & Uysal, M. S. (2021). Effective incentives for increasing COVID-19 vaccine uptake. Psychological Medicine, 1-3. Mcleod, S. (2018, December 28). Solomon Asch – Conformity experiment. Simply Psychology Organization . Retrieved November 5, 2021, from https://www.simplypsychology.org/asch-conformity.html. AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 14 AIFS. (2020, June 12). Responding to the coronavirus pandemic: Conducting a needs assessment in a time of rapid change. Child Family Community Australia. Retrieved November 4, 2021, from https://aifs.gov.au/cfca/expert-panel-project/responding-coronavirus-pandemic/conducting-needsassessment-time-rapid-change. OECD. (2021, May 10). Enhancing public trust in COVID-19 vaccination: The role of Governments. oecd.org. Retrieved November 5, 2021, from https://www.oecd.org/coronavirus/policy-responses/enhancing-publictrust-in-covid-19-vaccination-the-role-of-governments-eae0ec5a/. CDC. (2021, September 4). How to address COVID-19 vaccine misinformation. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved November 4, 2021, from https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/healthdepartments/addressing-vaccine-misinformation.html. El-Elimat, T., AbuAlSamen, M. M., Almomani, B. A., Al-Sawalha, N. A., & Alali, F. Q. (n.d.). Acceptance and attitudes toward covid-19 vaccines: A cross-sectional study from Jordan. PLOS ONE. Retrieved November 6, 2021, from https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0250555. AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 15 Appendix A: Personal reflection (assessment of group work) Aisha: This group assignment has given me the chance to be part of a health promotion program that is significantly important in the world’s current circumstances. The rapid spread of COVID-19 has affected us all in a way or another, and I was personally affected; therefore, I totally understand the fears and concerns of the population of our organization. Moreover, this assignment is critical to the public mental and physical health, thus, it requires extensive amount of research and myriad different skills. Fortunately, all group members have research skills and are able to collect new reliable data about the issue and the population. Also, each group member has her own unique skills in different fields such as communication, management, finance, etc. This, therefore, made the group work smooth and was a huge advantage to the development of the organization. Furthermore, I am extremely happy with the process of this assignment from the beginning until the end, it was organized and professional. In regard to my participation in this assignment, I believe I was engaging and collaborative with other group members and gave helpful suggestions and feedback to my colleagues. I was also respectful for my colleagues’ time and submitted my part of the work on time and asked for their advice and recommendations. In addition, although it was my first time writing such assignment and my first time working on a project for health promotion, it was surprisingly easy to me, and I honestly did not face any difficulties in any part of the assignment. I suppose the reason of this is because of my interest in the mental health and the actions of health promotion such as social marketing. Working on this project has benefit me in many ways; for example, I now know the principles of health promotion and how to apply them in clinical and community settings, I understand the difference between marketing and health promotion, and I recognize the role of occupational therapy in promoting health. Gadeer: In this assignment, I learned a lot, obtained extensive information through research, that have been expand my understanding and knowledge of health promotion course. In other hand, I faced some challenging’s during it because it was my first time to write Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan and there was a lot of new concepts to me. Another challenge for me was a times of group member available not everyone has the same time to meet because they should to do other duties. Also, the members of the group were cooperative smoothly to gather ideas from one another and combine them into one and respect each other’s points of view. My feeling about group process was happy, satisfied and I will be worked with them in future. However, the assignment helps me improve many skills such as time management through assessing AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 16 each of my responsibilities for priority. Also, it helps me to structure my work in a way that allows me to accomplish goals. Haneen: I enjoyed this experience so much from the start to finish. Every aspect was quite fun and informative. Our topic was very interesting, searching for literature and looking through what has already been done was very interesting. This project was the first I have done that focus on the populational level approach and as an occupational therapy student this was very important to explore more and change from the usual assignments that focuses only on the individual level approach. Although this project was new to me, I learned new things and gained new skills every step of the way. Working with the team was very difficult and we had a lot of conflicting opinions but we did our best to work through these challenges. We worked as a group to resolve our arguments and disagreements through prolonged discussions to try to reach the best possible solution. We have tried to take the time to provide constructivism feedback and comments to each other to improve the quality of the assignment and the overall project. As for me, I have been doing my best to communicate well with the group members and give my feedback as soon as possible as time is very limited as well as keep them updated with my work and discuss any potential changes that can be made before taking any further action to ensure that everyone is satisfied. Because of the difference of opinion that arose between team members, I learned a lot about how to deal with these differences, and how to please everyone in order to work effectively and sufficiently and make the work go smoothly despite these disagreements. Rana: Reem: Completing this assignment is a bit challenging since it is the first type that I have done on health promotions. Through handling it, I have learned new thinking ways, more on health promotion as well as noting that such projects demand detailed research with a specific deadline. Through teamwork with classmates, we have developed an extensive promotion program. Through respecting each other’s views and opinion we have been able to generate a health promotion program. Furthermore, each group member was able to actively engage without feeling excluded. I believe we divided the work evenly, and so the load was evenly distributed among the five of us. I have enjoyed teamwork with set goals and specific timeline. I feel that my involvement in this project was of a great degree, and that I performed all of my assigned responsibilities on time. I’m pleased with my contribution to this assignment and the group. Throughout this work, I’ve learnt a lot about my personal strengths. AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan Appendix B: Group work declaration 17 AT 6: Preliminary Health Promotion Program Plan 18 YOUR FEAR IS VALID ‫معك حق تخاف‬ By: Aisha Alanazi – Gadeer Medshel – Haneen Saleh Rana Alshahrani – Reeem Alnafea Table of contents: ✓Introduction ✓Overall project goal and objectives ✓Strategies 1) Social Marketing 2) Education for Empowerment 3) Advocacy ✓Conclusion Overall project goal and objectives • “Your Fear Is Valid” is an organization that is meant to address the psychological and emotional distress caused by and associated with SARS-CoV-2/COVID 19 vaccine hesitancy. Objectives: The anxiety and fear level of the vaccine will decrease among Saudi individuals The number of vaccinated individuals in Saudi Arabia will increase The spread of misinformation/misunderstanding about COVID-19 vaccination in the Saudi community will be corrected The Issue Research has discovered that there are myriad factors associated with a great susceptibility to COVID-19 misinformation, including vaccine misinformation. These involve the usage of social media as a key source of information and having a decreased level of trust in scientists. The general misconceptions about COVID-19 vaccines have included false claims about their safety, effectiveness, ingredients, side effects, and the purpose of the vaccine (Nuzhath et al., 2020). 1.2. Strategies & Rational YouTube strategy : Established a short YouTube video to aware all target population in the community about myth vs truth of COVID-19 vaccine to correct their information and increase their knowledge about the vaccination. Rational: Social media platforms such as YouTube are used by many people to seek and share health-related information that may influence their decision-making about COVID-19 vaccination (Basch et al., 2020). 1.2.1. Outcomes To attract individuals in KSA as the video contains sound of person that explained a brief information about the Covid- 19 vaccine, results to increase their awareness and correcting their information about Corona vaccine myths. Also, all information on video is backed up by evidence and reliable sources. 1.2.2. Implementation plan 1 ……………………………………………………………………………………………..……. 2 4 3 Collect the content of the video Create video Add sound to the video Promot video via YouTube and Twitter 1.2.2. Implementation plan (video via YouTube ) Activities Determine the content and purpose of the video Filming the video. share the video. 1/11 2/11 10/11 15/11 20/11 21/11 1.2.3. Monitor and evaluation plan Objectives Raise awareness for Saudi individuals who have not taken the COVID-19 vaccination in community by providing correct information about vaccine Impact indictor By monitor the number of comments and likes and the percentage of vaccinated individuals in KSA Evaluation method / tool The views number via YouTube and weekly news from the ministry of health (MOH) about COVID-19 and number of vaccinated people Timeline and responsibilities • Timeline Every 6 weeks • Responsibilities Gadeer 1.2.4. The Dissemination plan What? How? Where? Who? project evaluation findings Correct information about COVID-19 vaccine PowerPoint presentation Video Class, PNU YouTube Supervisor: Dr. Salwa Ahmed Classmates All people, specifically Saudi people 1.2.5. Materials: video ‫)صحة فريق بوابة وزارة‬n.d.). .‫ وزارة الصحة السعودية‬.‫األسئلة الشائعة حول فيروس كورونا ولقاح فيروس كورونا‬Retrieved November 24, 2021, from https://www.moh.gov.sa/Ministry/HotTopics/Pages/COVID-19-Vaccine.aspx. Topic 10 Tutorial: Working with the media Checklist for a good media release 1. Example structure for the media release ORGANISATION’S LETTERHEAD (with organization name, logo & address) FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (Today’s date) OR Embargoed until (Date for release) Contact: (Name) Phone/EMAIL: MEDIA RELEASE HEADLINE (Short. Capital letters, bold & large. Attention-grabbing, newsworthy) Para 1 • WHAT happened or will happen • WHO is involved • WHEN and WHERE Para 2 • WHY is it important & newsworthy → Several ‘News values’ are incorporated into the release → Links to wider related health and/or social issues Para 3 • PERSONALISE – QUOTE from a local community member or expert involved with this issue OR – HUMAN INTEREST’ STORY of a personal experience related to this issue Para 4 • MORE DETAILS – Further quotes from spokespeople – Photo/interview opportunities (who, when, contact details) Para 5 • HOW TO FIND OUT MORE – Contact person at your organization (for more info) – Your contact details Final OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media • One-sentence description of the organization and their key reason for involvement in this issue (often as a ‘banner’ or ‘footer’) OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media 2. Layout, style and tone • Catchy, short title/headline • One page, 1.5-spaced, use letterhead. Use colour and graphics • Concise first sentences … “the main points first” • Plain language: Short sentences, point form; avoid jargon & ‘abns’ (abbreviations) • Tone: Invite people’s interest rather than telling them ‘what you think they should know’. • Personalise: Use of local people and good “direct quotes” • Information about where to find out more: contact people (several options), websites etc. 3. Background brief fact sheet -checklist Include facts with references and/or web URLs Include statistics: local data, recent reports, quotes from experts Use ‘creative’ epidemiology i.e. Be local: Rather than 18,000 deaths per year quote 10 deaths a day in Riyadh (their own city) Costs: Compare annual cost of treating a problem with beneficial alternatives this money could buy, such as how many schools, a new ambulance… Comparisons: Use comparisons “more Saudi women die from breast cancer each month than have died from AIDS in the past decade” Should be 200 words (for your assessment tasks) OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media How to plan a media release for AT4 and AT7 1. Plan a media release for any aspect of your project for which you could be seeking publicity. Decide: • What are the key outcomes you are seeking from publicity? • Which media publication/s will you target and why? Consider the audience for this publication: What audience group/s do you want to reach? What are the characteristics of this audience? What issues concern them? What is the ‘hook’- or ‘news angle’- the aspect of the story likely to be of most interest to this audience? • What is newsworthy about your project? How could you frame it differently so it is more newsworthy? See list of ‘News Values’ below. 2. Write and format the release (See ‘checklist for a good media release’) 3. Peer review and reflection Swap with another student and give constructive feedback for improvement Then give feedback to the rest of your group about your key learning today and any skills you need to work on. Tips for making your story more newsworthy Is your story ‘newsworthy’? If your media is to be selected for coverage, then it must be about something ‘newsworthy’. News selection is based on ‘news values’ Ask yourself, ‘Why is this story newsworthy’? Build the release around ‘news values’. News Values • CURRENT news or event (happening now or soon) • CONSEQUENCE: how many people will be affected & in what ways • CLOSENESS occurring in local area/local people or organizations • NOVELTY: bizarre, unexpected or extraordinary person or event • PROMINENT organisations, persons, celebrities • HUMAN INTEREST: personal story about someone affected by this issue • CONFLICT: are there people, groups or organizations with different/competing views about this issue or project? OR (even more newsworthy)… has there been tension, disagreement, opposition, a protest or conflict or other UNEXPECTED event or outcome related to this project? OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media What aspects of the program could be newsworthy? Examples of aspects of your program that could be newsworthy may be: • community meeting, • launch or event, • new program in the community, website, new service, • call for resources, need for help/volunteers, • expose a ‘problem’, raise awareness about an ‘injustice’, • generate community action on an issue, encourage people to write to the media, put pressure on local politicians/decision-makers etc… OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media Fix this media release: Indigenous parents centre Examine the media release ‘Indigenous Parents’ Centre using the ‘checklist for a good media release’. Identify the strengths of the release and list 3 improvements to the layout, wording or content of this release. Alice Springs Hospital Alice Springs NT 0871 MEDIA RELEASE INDIGENOUS PARENTS’ CENTRE On the 6th of October, the Indigenous Parents Association (I.P.A) ‘Gurung’ centre will be opening its doors for the first time. the Gurung centre’s primary aim is to educate and promote breast feeding in Indigenous mothers. Cetnre manager Dr Patricia Gilchrist says: “with the state of Indigenous health, anything that is going to help out Indigenous children within our community is a blessing.” Breast milk is the natural and best possible food for babies – it contains proteins, fats and carbohydrates at levels that are appropriate for an infant’s optimal development. The poor health status of many Indigenous infants is often related to inadequate nutrition and its relationship to infection. The Gurung centre will primarily be funded by the Alice Springs Hospital and in turn, the State Government, but will also receive funding from local Indigenous organisations. The Indigenous Parents Association is a non-profit organisation providing free support and services for Indigenous parents. Contact: Alinta Marne, Director of the Indigenous Parents Association any time or on the opening day from 1:00-3:00pm. OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media BACKGROUND BRIEF: FACT SHEET Human breast milk acts as a baby’s first immunization. It provides antibodies which protect the baby from many common respiratory and intestinal diseases, and also contains living immune cells (1). Studies have found that artificially fed babies have higher rates of middle ear infections, pneumonia, and cases of gastroenteritis (1). Traditionally, Indigenous babies were breast fed until at least two years of age (2). In 2001, AIHW found that 78% of Indigenous children under 4 years were breastfed (2). In more recent times, in urban areas, Indigenous babies have been weaned onto diets high in fat, sugar and protein which can affect health outcomes later in life (2). Otitis media, a middle ear infection, is a big problem for Aboriginal children. They are 10 times more likely to have the infection than non-Indigenous children. Breastfeeding helps to protect against infection (3). Dr. Woolridge of the Australian Government says: “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have the highest rates of severe and persistent middle ear infection (otitis media) in Australia.” (4). References Dermer, A., & Montgomery, A. (1997). Breastfeeding: Good for Babies, Mothers, and the Planet. Accessed on 24/09/2007 from http://medicalreporter.health.org/tmr0297/breastfeed0297.html 2 ABS (2003). The Health and Welfare of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. Cat No. 4704.0 3 NSW Health-South Eastern Sydney Illawarra (2007). Aboriginal Otitis Media. Accessed on 24/09/2007 from http://www.sch.edu.au/health/factsheets/joint/?otitis_media.htm 4 Australian Government-Department of Health and Ageing (2001). Federal government addressing middle ear infection in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Accessed on 24/09/2007 from http://www.healthconnect.gov.au/internet/wcms/publishing.nsf/Content/health-mediarel-yr2001mw-mw01076.htm OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media Fix this media release: Indigenous parents centre – answer sheet Task 1: Solution with improvements highlighted in yellow Alice Springs Hospital Gap Road Alice Springs NT 0871 Phone:(08) 8951 7777 Fax: (08) 8951 7988 28/09/2007 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE MEDIA RELEASE NEW INDIGENOUS PARENTS’ CENTRE OPEN: CELEBRATIONS ALL WELCOME On the 6th of October, the Indigenous Parents Association (I.P.A) ‘Gurung’ centre will be opening its doors for the first time. Affiliated with the Alice Springs Hospital, the Gurung centre’s primary aim is to educate and promote breast feeding in Indigenous mothers. Aunty Patricia Gilchrist (a well respected Aboriginal elder and mother) says: “with our state of health, anything that is going to help out our children within our community is a blessing.” Breast milk is the natural and best possible food for babies – it contains proteins, fats and carbohydrates at levels that are appropriate for an infant’s optimal development. The poor health status of many Indigenous infants is often related to inadequate nutrition and its relationship to infection. The Gurung centre will be a place for Indigenous parents to go and talk to other Indigenous parents about any concerns they have with themselves and their children. The Gurung centre will primarily be funded by the Alice Springs Hospital and in turn, the State Government, but will also receive funding from local Indigenous organisations. The Indigenous Parents Association is a non-profit organisation providing free support and services for Indigenous parents. Alinta Marne, Director of the Indigenous Parents Association is available for interview. Aunty Patricia Gilchrist will be available for photos on opening day from 1:00-3:00pm. For further information: Jarrah Halvorson (08) 8950 2497 OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media Topic 10 Tutorial: Working with the media Checklist for a good media release 1. Example structure for the media release ORGANISATION’S LETTERHEAD (with organization name, logo & address) FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (Today’s date) OR Embargoed until (Date for release) Contact: (Name) Phone/EMAIL: MEDIA RELEASE HEADLINE (Short. Capital letters, bold & large. Attention-grabbing, newsworthy) Para 1 • WHAT happened or will happen • WHO is involved • WHEN and WHERE Para 2 • WHY is it important & newsworthy → Several ‘News values’ are incorporated into the release → Links to wider related health and/or social issues Para 3 • PERSONALISE – QUOTE from a local community member or expert involved with this issue OR – HUMAN INTEREST’ STORY of a personal experience related to this issue Para 4 • MORE DETAILS – Further quotes from spokespeople – Photo/interview opportunities (who, when, contact details) Para 5 • HOW TO FIND OUT MORE – Contact person at your organization (for more info) – Your contact details Final OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media • One-sentence description of the organization and their key reason for involvement in this issue (often as a ‘banner’ or ‘footer’) OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media 2. Layout, style and tone • Catchy, short title/headline • One page, 1.5-spaced, use letterhead. Use colour and graphics • Concise first sentences … “the main points first” • Plain language: Short sentences, point form; avoid jargon & ‘abns’ (abbreviations) • Tone: Invite people’s interest rather than telling them ‘what you think they should know’. • Personalise: Use of local people and good “direct quotes” • Information about where to find out more: contact people (several options), websites etc. 3. Background brief fact sheet -checklist Include facts with references and/or web URLs Include statistics: local data, recent reports, quotes from experts Use ‘creative’ epidemiology i.e. Be local: Rather than 18,000 deaths per year quote 10 deaths a day in Riyadh (their own city) Costs: Compare annual cost of treating a problem with beneficial alternatives this money could buy, such as how many schools, a new ambulance… Comparisons: Use comparisons “more Saudi women die from breast cancer each month than have died from AIDS in the past decade” Should be 200 words (for your assessment tasks) OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media How to plan a media release for AT4 and AT7 1. Plan a media release for any aspect of your project for which you could be seeking publicity. Decide: • What are the key outcomes you are seeking from publicity? • Which media publication/s will you target and why? Consider the audience for this publication: What audience group/s do you want to reach? What are the characteristics of this audience? What issues concern them? What is the ‘hook’- or ‘news angle’- the aspect of the story likely to be of most interest to this audience? • What is newsworthy about your project? How could you frame it differently so it is more newsworthy? See list of ‘News Values’ below. 2. Write and format the release (See ‘checklist for a good media release’) 3. Peer review and reflection Swap with another student and give constructive feedback for improvement Then give feedback to the rest of your group about your key learning today and any skills you need to work on. Tips for making your story more newsworthy Is your story ‘newsworthy’? If your media is to be selected for coverage, then it must be about something ‘newsworthy’. News selection is based on ‘news values’ Ask yourself, ‘Why is this story newsworthy’? Build the release around ‘news values’. News Values • CURRENT news or event (happening now or soon) • CONSEQUENCE: how many people will be affected & in what ways • CLOSENESS occurring in local area/local people or organizations • NOVELTY: bizarre, unexpected or extraordinary person or event • PROMINENT organisations, persons, celebrities • HUMAN INTEREST: personal story about someone affected by this issue • CONFLICT: are there people, groups or organizations with different/competing views about this issue or project? OR (even more newsworthy)… has there been tension, disagreement, opposition, a protest or conflict or other UNEXPECTED event or outcome related to this project? OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media What aspects of the program could be newsworthy? Examples of aspects of your program that could be newsworthy may be: • community meeting, • launch or event, • new program in the community, website, new service, • call for resources, need for help/volunteers, • expose a ‘problem’, raise awareness about an ‘injustice’, • generate community action on an issue, encourage people to write to the media, put pressure on local politicians/decision-makers etc… OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media Fix this media release: Indigenous parents centre Examine the media release ‘Indigenous Parents’ Centre using the ‘checklist for a good media release’. Identify the strengths of the release and list 3 improvements to the layout, wording or content of this release. Alice Springs Hospital Alice Springs NT 0871 MEDIA RELEASE INDIGENOUS PARENTS’ CENTRE On the 6th of October, the Indigenous Parents Association (I.P.A) ‘Gurung’ centre will be opening its doors for the first time. the Gurung centre’s primary aim is to educate and promote breast feeding in Indigenous mothers. Cetnre manager Dr Patricia Gilchrist says: “with the state of Indigenous health, anything that is going to help out Indigenous children within our community is a blessing.” Breast milk is the natural and best possible food for babies – it contains proteins, fats and carbohydrates at levels that are appropriate for an infant’s optimal development. The poor health status of many Indigenous infants is often related to inadequate nutrition and its relationship to infection. The Gurung centre will primarily be funded by the Alice Springs Hospital and in turn, the State Government, but will also receive funding from local Indigenous organisations. The Indigenous Parents Association is a non-profit organisation providing free support and services for Indigenous parents. Contact: Alinta Marne, Director of the Indigenous Parents Association any time or on the opening day from 1:00-3:00pm. OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media BACKGROUND BRIEF: FACT SHEET Human breast milk acts as a baby’s first immunization. It provides antibodies which protect the baby from many common respiratory and intestinal diseases, and also contains living immune cells (1). Studies have found that artificially fed babies have higher rates of middle ear infections, pneumonia, and cases of gastroenteritis (1). Traditionally, Indigenous babies were breast fed until at least two years of age (2). In 2001, AIHW found that 78% of Indigenous children under 4 years were breastfed (2). In more recent times, in urban areas, Indigenous babies have been weaned onto diets high in fat, sugar and protein which can affect health outcomes later in life (2). Otitis media, a middle ear infection, is a big problem for Aboriginal children. They are 10 times more likely to have the infection than non-Indigenous children. Breastfeeding helps to protect against infection (3). Dr. Woolridge of the Australian Government says: “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians have the highest rates of severe and persistent middle ear infection (otitis media) in Australia.” (4). References Dermer, A., & Montgomery, A. (1997). Breastfeeding: Good for Babies, Mothers, and the Planet. Accessed on 24/09/2007 from http://medicalreporter.health.org/tmr0297/breastfeed0297.html 2 ABS (2003). The Health and Welfare of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. Cat No. 4704.0 3 NSW Health-South Eastern Sydney Illawarra (2007). Aboriginal Otitis Media. Accessed on 24/09/2007 from http://www.sch.edu.au/health/factsheets/joint/?otitis_media.htm 4 Australian Government-Department of Health and Ageing (2001). Federal government addressing middle ear infection in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Accessed on 24/09/2007 from http://www.healthconnect.gov.au/internet/wcms/publishing.nsf/Content/health-mediarel-yr2001mw-mw01076.htm OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media Fix this media release: Indigenous parents centre – answer sheet Task 1: Solution with improvements highlighted in yellow Alice Springs Hospital Gap Road Alice Springs NT 0871 Phone:(08) 8951 7777 Fax: (08) 8951 7988 28/09/2007 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE MEDIA RELEASE NEW INDIGENOUS PARENTS’ CENTRE OPEN: CELEBRATIONS ALL WELCOME On the 6th of October, the Indigenous Parents Association (I.P.A) ‘Gurung’ centre will be opening its doors for the first time. Affiliated with the Alice Springs Hospital, the Gurung centre’s primary aim is to educate and promote breast feeding in Indigenous mothers. Aunty Patricia Gilchrist (a well respected Aboriginal elder and mother) says: “with our state of health, anything that is going to help out our children within our community is a blessing.” Breast milk is the natural and best possible food for babies – it contains proteins, fats and carbohydrates at levels that are appropriate for an infant’s optimal development. The poor health status of many Indigenous infants is often related to inadequate nutrition and its relationship to infection. The Gurung centre will be a place for Indigenous parents to go and talk to other Indigenous parents about any concerns they have with themselves and their children. The Gurung centre will primarily be funded by the Alice Springs Hospital and in turn, the State Government, but will also receive funding from local Indigenous organisations. The Indigenous Parents Association is a non-profit organisation providing free support and services for Indigenous parents. Alinta Marne, Director of the Indigenous Parents Association is available for interview. Aunty Patricia Gilchrist will be available for photos on opening day from 1:00-3:00pm. For further information: Jarrah Halvorson (08) 8950 2497 OCC413 Topic 10 Tutorial – Working with the Media The Breast Way 12 Silkwood Way Toorak, VIC 3645 PH: (03) 9623 7118 thebreastway@tbw.org.au 30/05/2011 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE MEDIA RELEASE BREASTFEEDING: DADS CAN DO IT TOO! NEW BREASTFEEDING EDUCATION PROGRAMME FOR FATHERS & SUPPORTIVE PARTNERS BEGINS On the 3rd of June, The Breast Way, an affiliate of the Royal Women’s Hospital will be commencing its first ‘Breastfeeding: Dads Can Do It Too!’ classes. The primary objective of these classes is to educate new dads and supportive partners on the benefits of breastfeeding and strategies they could employ to actively assist and be involved in their child’s breastfeeding experience. Orlando Bloom (famous for his work in blockbuster films such as The Lord of the Rings Trilogy and Pirates of the Caribbean, and new celebrity father) recommends dads attend these classes. He says: “When my son was born three months ago, I was completely unaware of just how wonderful breast milk was for him, or just how I could assist my wife with his feeding. These classes would have been invaluable for me as they incorporate the teaching and practice of key strategies dads can use to assist their partners’ feeding. Let’s face it; breast is best.” Breast milk is naturally produced and superior to all other nutritional substitutes for infants. Feeding infants breast milk promotes optimal brain development and helps to protect them from illness and infection. Breast milk should be the exclusive foodstuff for the first six months of a child’s life, but too often this does not eventuate. Often, fathers are unaware of the role they can play in assisting their partners to initiate and sustain their breastfeeding. The Breastfeeding: Dads Can Do It Too! classes offer an opportunity for new dads to meet and converse with other fathers who share similar experiences, learn useful strategies they can use to assist their partners’ breastfeeding, and discuss any concerns with health professionals. The Breast Way is a non-profit organisation providing free support and services for parents. Katherine Inglis, Chief Education and Empowerment Officer is available for interview. Orlando Bloom will be attending the first class and will be available for photos following from 2:00-2:30 pm. For further information: (P) 0400 000 000 or (E) dads@tbw.org.au The Breast Way 12 Silkwood Way Toorak, VIC 3645 PH: (03) 9623 7118 thebreastway@tbw.org.au BACKGROUND BRIEF Breastfeeding rates are declining. Half of Australian mothers stop exclusively breastfeeding their babies by the time they are three months old1. Breastfeeding protects babies from illness and infection. It also decreases risk of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, childhood asthma and some leukaemias, while also encouraging optimal brain development2. For mothers, breastfeeding promotes faster recovery from birth, promotes return to pre-pregnancy weight, reduces risk of breast and ovarian cancers, type II diabetes, and osteoporosis3&4. WHO5, UNICEF6, and the Australian Federal Government1 all recommend exclusive breastfeeding of infants until 6 months of age. By 6 months of age 38% of children are breastfed by mothers aged 18-29, compared to 54% of children with mothers aged 30 or over1. REFERENCES Source 1: The Breast Way (n.d.). Retrieved April 10, 2011 from http://www.thebreastway.com/ 1 Australian Bureau of Statistics [ABS]. (2006). Breastfeeding in Australia 2001. Retrieved April 14, 2011, from http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/4810.0.55.001 2 Australian Breastfeeding Association. (2005).Why breastfeeding is important. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.breastfeeding.asn.au/bfinfo/general.html 3 The Royal Women’s Hospital. (2009). Breastfeeding: antenatal checklist. Retrieved April 20, 2011, from http://www.thewomens.org.au/BreastfeedingAntenatalchecklist?searchTerms[]=breastfeeding. 4 The Royal Women’s Hospital. (2010). Breastfeeding your baby – Important information for new mothers. Retrieved April 20, 2011, from http://www.thewomens.org.au/uploads/downloads/HealthInformation /Publications/RWHbfyb_english.pdf. 5 World Health Organization. (n.d.). 10 facts on breastfeeding. Retrieved April 20, 2011 from http://www.who.int/features/factfiles/breastfeeding/facts/en/index.html 6 United Nations Children’s Fund [UNICEF]. Nutrition: Infant and child feeding. Retrieved April 30, 2011, from http://www.unicef.org/nutrition/index_breastfeeding.html 7.1 Appendix A: Press Release Community Gardens Jessie Sordello 46 Greens Road Frankston 3199 E: twg.gardens@gmail.com P: 1300 594 203 F: 1300 594 200 For immediate release 4/9/12 MEDIA RELEASE LOCAL GARDEN TO BRING HEALTH FOR ALL On the 11th September at 7.30pm, citizens of Frankston will be invited to come together for the first time for a community meeting to begin the process of developing Frankston’s first community garden. The idea was first developed by Frankston Primary School Principal Joan Walker who states ‘There is a growing problem within the school and community of ill health and social isolation, the creation of an edible community garden that is made accessible for all will strive to overcome these serious issues’. Details of the location, funding and planting options will be decided through ongoing community meetings. They will include education sessions, workshops and activities that will be run by the project educational officer and local mum Jessie Sordello who says: ‘I am excited to be able to bring the entire community together for a cause that affects us all’. The meetings will be conducted at Frankston community Centre and Frankston primary school at convenient times to cater for all community members of all ages who are wishing to become involved. The meetings will provide all local residents within the opportunity to get together for a great cause to share their knowledge, ideas and skills to develop a garden that can be owned by all. The workshops will provide sessions for both adults and children to learn and discover the wonders of growing their own garden. All members of the community are encouraged to come along. Jessie Sordello will be available for interview after the completion of the community meeting. For further information, the community garden project team can be contacted on: E: twg.gardens@gmail.com P: 1300 594 203 Jessie Sordello; Educational officer Natasha Jagas; Financial co‐ordinator Sarah Lombard; Marketing director Together we grow: Community gardens: a resource for future, a resource for all 7.2 Appendix B: Background Brief “Together We Grow” E: twg.gardens@gmail.com P: 1300 594 203 Fact Sheet For children and adolescents, the 2007‐08 National Health Survey results indicate that 24.9% of children aged 5 – 17 years are overweight or obese and 25.8% of boys and 24.0% of girls are either overweight or obese (1). Results from this survey reveal that in 2007‐08, 61.4% of the Australian population are either overweight or obese (1). Researchers have found that community gardens reduce social isolation, increase interaction between different cultures, giving people a sense of place and of purpose, pride in their achievements and increasing ownership and use of shared spaces. Benefits to the physical health of participants through exercise and better nutrition are also reported to have occurred (2). People with a disability were more likely than those without a disability to experience discrimination in government, health and educational settings (3). The National Health and Medical Research (NHRMC) recommend consumption of at least two servings of fruit and five of vegetables each day. Overall, almost half (47%) of the Australian population aged 12 years and over reported a fruit intake of one serve or less daily, and the majority (70%) reported a vegetable intake of three serves or less daily (4). Community gardens promote the enjoyment of a wide variety of fresh, locally grown produces, enable gardeners to supplement their family’s diet with organic herbs and vegetables, and provide opportunities for teaching gardeners and the broader community about the benefits of community gardens (5). References 1 Australian Government ‐ Department of Health and Ageing. (2010, October 22). Overweight and Obesity in Australia. Retrieved May 20, 2011, from http://www.health.gov.au/internet/healthyactive/publishing.nsf/Content/overweight‐obesity 2 Urbis Keys Young Pty Ltd. (2004). Community Greening Program Evaluation Final Report. Prepared for: The Botanic Gardens Trust and the NSW Department of Housing. Sydney: Urbis JHD Pty Ltd. 3 Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2011, February 16). Disability: Disability and Social Inclusion. Retrieved May 20, 2011, from http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/lookup/4704.0Chapter525Oct+2010 4 Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2006, December 8). Health Risk Factors, Australia, 2001. Retrieved May 20, 2011, from http://www.abs.gov.au/Ausstats/abs@.nsf/0e5fa1cc95cd093c4a2568110007852b/b8b08eafca9de7b3ca256d fc0083adf0!OpenDocument 5 Nettle, C. (2010). Growing Community: Starting and nurturing community gardens. Adelaide: Health SA, Government of South Australia and Community and Neighbourhood Houses and Centres Association Inc. AT7 FINAL REPORT- ADVOCACY STRATEGY ____________________________________________ Health Promotion OCC413 “AT7 final report- advocacy strategy “ Dr. Safaa Elkholi Author: Alma Alanazi 437000602 Contributors: Maha Abuzaid 437000601 Shoug Alorf i AT7 FINAL REPORT- ADVOCACY STRATEGY ii Date of completion Sunday 8th of December, 2019. Acknowledgements The author would like to acknowledge those people who assisted in completing this report at the right time and the way the author was expected it to be. And special thanks to Dr. Safaa Elkholi for her ongoing consultation and guidance throughout the whole project, and her experience in vocational rehabilitation which contributed to the production of the program. The author would like to thank other team members, Maha and Shoug, who have focused intensively and worked diligently on other parts of the project, which are social marketing and education for empowerment, in which all have built and improved this project. AT7 FINAL REPORT- ADVOCACY STRATEGY Table of contents Acknowledgements…………………………………………………………………….ii Organizational details……………………………………………………………………1 Advocacy strategy plan………………………………………………………………….5 Strategy definition and rationale……………………………………………………………………………5 Strategy plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ……………7 Implementation plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . …..8 Monitoring and Evaluation plan……………………………………………………….9 Dissemination plan…………………………………………………………………….11 References………………………………………………….……………………………..12 Appendices ………………………………………………….……………………………16 Appendix A: Proposal to decision-makers…………………………………………………14 Appendix B: Petition………………………………………………………………………..17 Appendix C: Press release………………………………………………………………….20 Appendix D: Background brief …………………………………………………………………..23 Appendix E: Timelines for Implementation Plan ……………………………………24 iii Running head: AT7 FINAL REPORT- ADVOCACY STRATEGY 1 1. Organization Details Organization’s name: Mutahaye Email: Mutahaye21.org@gmail.com Tel: 0552710906 Community/population group: unemployed down syndrome clients Mission statement: To empower Down syndrome clients to have better lives, and to participate positively in the organizations and communities in which they work and live through vocational rehabilitation programs. Purpose of the program: This organization aims to enhance the individual’s independence and function in the worker’s role, by focusing on the individual’s physical, psychological, and social needs. Introducing the issues: Worldwide, down syndrome clients have low financial status, low employment rates (Kumin, & Schoenbrodt, 2016), and they need to integrate more in the community, in which all can be solved once they are provided with proper training that lead to job opportunities. Nationally, it has been reported that the number of down syndrome clients is 18 per 10000 live births (Al Salloum et al., 2015), making it crucial to initiate such a program. Employed down syndrome clients have a better quality of life and chances for development; further, it has been proven that lack of employment has an association with depressive symptoms (Kim, & von Dem Knesebeck, 2016). Beyond providing down syndrome clients it with an income, employment gives them a sense of identity, contribution, belonging, and establishes additional relationships and interests. Moreover, employing DS clients give them valuable opportunities that are critical for their enhanced health and well-being, by having something meaningful to do – which is AT7 FINAL REPORT- ADVOCACY STRATEGY 2 work, to some extent; social integration; and physical activity. Besides, Kumin and Schoenbrodt, (2016) have stated that participation of young people with down syndrome in open employment may positively influence family’s quality of life. Project strategies, and objectives, and outcomes: Strategy Social marketing: Change the image of the abilities of clients with Down syndrome to community, through awareness campaigns in certain places in the community, create simple and clear video that shows their suffering without employment. Moreover, use media advertising to reach out to companies and organizations that are able to provide jobs and support for DS clients. Objectives: Expected Outcome Increase the awareness and 80% of community knowledge among individuals knowledge will increase with Down Syndrome and the about the ability of local community about adult individuals with DS to work with Down Syndrome – 70% linked the video and capabilities and their rights to wrote a positive opinions. work in order to enhance and – 60% of companies will influence on the decision have the knowledge about makers. how to benefit from DS abilities to employ them AT7 FINAL REPORT- ADVOCACY STRATEGY 3 79% of adults with down Education for empowerment: 1- To build vocational skills syndrome to be empowered Community development: and working abilities of down and have the required skills Assessing and screening syndrome adults. people with down syndrome 2- Invite organizations and to identify their occupational companies to establish new performance issues that affect policies to provide job or prevent them from being…
Purchase answer to see full attachment
Explanation & Answer:

2000 words
Tags: