Then, use the Five Whys Analysis to drill down to the root cause of this problem. What do you think is the root cause? Why?

Defining a problem is often the most important step in the problem-solving process. It’s also the ideal time to identify a problem’s root cause so that you can address it directly. One technique for getting at the root cause is the “five whys analysis.”

 

In this method, you start with a problem and repeatedly ask, “why,” usually five times, answering your own question each time until you get to the problem’s root cause.

 

Watch the Khan Academy video, “Eutrophication and Dead Zones,” (https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/ecology/biogeochemical-cycles/v/eutrophication-and-dead-zones) which highlights the problem of dead zones appearing in coastal waters.

Then, use the Five Whys Analysis to drill down to the root cause of this problem. What do you think is the root cause? Why?

Now, try the same method with a problem you’re facing in your personal or professional life. What is the problem? What is its root cause?

Remember to answer each part of the question with a minimum of one paragraph of substantive content that is 5-7 sentences