Week-2-Ronnie-Crenshaw

THIS IS ONLY AN INTERPRETATION, FIVE SENTENCES AND A QUESTION IS ALL I NEED. TELL ME YOUR THOUGHTS, HAVE REFERENCES! ASK PROBING QUESTIONS AND MAKE STATEMENTS BASED OFF WHAT THEY WROTE

Post a brief description of the criminal justice role you selected and describe two ways in which communication is used in that role. Then explain why communication is used in those ways, including any goals that are intended to be met by the communication. Finally, explain whether the communications you described are effective in the job specified or not. Be specific and provide examples to illustrate your point.

A burglary suppression officer is a normal patrol officer assigned to a precinct and specific areas where burglaries are high. In the role of a burglary suppression officer, communication is needed between the burglary suppression Sergeant, burglary detective, and the district attorney. Burglary suppression officers are usually in a team of seven or six including the Sergeant.

Emails and face to face communication are used to communicate effectively from supervisor to officer to district attorney. These ways of communication are used so the information is transferred effectively and so that the officer understands his instructions.

Virtually everything that happens in the discipline of criminal justice happens on paper first (Johnson, Rettig, Scott & Garrison, 2015). After roll call, where we receive our face to face instructions, the supervisor sends the officers and his superiors emails about what was discussed in roll call so there would be written documentation about what was said. Johnson et al (2015) explains that writing is the best way to learn and the only purpose writing can have is to express what you already know or think.

From my experience, these ways of communication are effective because the burglaries in the assigned areas decreased the following week and the reports sent to the district attorney were written as instructed.

Refernce:

Johnson, W. A., Rettig, R. P., Scott, G. M., & Garrison, S. M. (2015). The criminal justice student writer’s manual (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Chapter 1 “Writing as Communication”